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Sola Scriptura (1)

On March 3 and 4 in Pasadena, CA, there was a debate between leading Protestant and Catholic theologians on the topic: What Still Divides Us; A Protestant and Roman Catholic Debate. In this issue and the next, we present the opening speech of the conference given by our own contributing editor, Dr. W. Robert Godfrey, […]

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Sola Scripture (II)

In June we presented Dr. Godfrey’s address on the sufficiency of Scripture alone, given at a debate between leading Protestant and Catholic theologians on the topic: What Still Divides Us: A Protestant and Roman Catholic Debate. This month Dr. Godfrey discusses the Roman Catholic distortions of this doctrine and his conclusions on the matter. CHARACTERlSTIC […]

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Defining Roman Catholicism and Protestantism Alert readers may have noticed that in the opening article we did not abbreviate the Church of Rome with the term “Catholicism.” The adjective “Roman” is important for this series because its aim is to describe the historic and ongoing differences between Protestants and Rome. Consequently, Roman Catholicism has a […]

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Anti-Catholicism, Good and Bad

In the first two articles in this series we attempted to define a Protestant as a western Christian (as opposed to Eastern Orthodoxy) who is self-consciously out of fellowship with the Bishop of Rome but belongs to a Protestant church. This means that Protestantism emerged in the West, not in the East where the Orthodox […]

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Evangelism is Not Enough

Contemporary American Protestantism has its discontents. Two ex-Protestants, both well-known sons of famous Protestant ministers, have expressed their disenchantment in prominent books. In 2007, Frank Schaeffer wrote, Crazy for God. This autobiography is as colorful as its subtitle, “How I Grew Up as One of the Elect, Helped Found the Religious Right, and Lived to […]

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Rome: A Synagogue of Satan?

Since we have spent the last few installments clearing away some contemporary misconceptions about Roman Catholicism, readers may be wondering what is so objectionable about Rome after all. It would be simple enough to string together a set of ad hominem arguments against the Roman Catholic Church. Popular Protestant hostility to Rome may come from […]

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One of the ideas that has informed this series on Protestantism is the prevailing notion among many Christians in North America that the days of Protestant and Roman Catholic antagonism are over. In her recent book on the emerging church movement, for instance, The Great Emergence, Phyllis Tickle argues that Christendom is on the verge […]

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The Crux of the Reformation

One of the oddest aspects of contemporary American Protestantism is the lukewarm attachment if not indifference by evangelicals to the doctrine of justification. If any particular doctrine was responsible for the rupture of Christendom, it was the understanding of salvation that resulted from Reformers’ teaching on justification by faith alone. Of course, the formal principle […]

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The Good Life

Last month we studied the doctrine of justification, the “hinge” on which the Protestant faith turns, according to John Calvin. John Murray described this as “the crux of the Reformation.” Justification by faith alone is the “hinge” or the “crux” because it understands faith as resting on and receiving the complete sufficiency of Christ for […]

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